Chatham Hill Dogs
Hamlin, Pennsylvania
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Long-Hair Weimaraners

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Long Hair Weimaraners have been around from the beginning. The gene is recessive, so they are not as commonly found as the Weimaraners, though in Germany where the breed originates they are just a popular as the Weimaraners.

The coat type is obviously an asset in Germany by withstanding the colder climate. The breed standard is the same as for a Weimaraner, except for the length of coat and the
fact that they do not have their tails docked. The Long Hairs coat as a mature adult is one and a half to two inches long, with extra feathering around the tail and legs. The tail coverage is excellent protection in the field. The coat is easy to manage and free flowing and does not mat or shed to the same extent as most coated dogs.

We have fallen in love with the Weimaraner---the Long-Hair Weimaraner, that is....not the short hair weim. If you read the history of the Long-Hair Weimaraner you will find out the that the only country that does not accept the Long Hair Weim in the Kennel Club show ring is America. We here at Chatham Hill--love to go against the "norm" in the dog world--as we do with the Yellow Flatcoat....therefore, we like to take it upon ourselves and intentionally breed ONLY for the Long Hair Weimaraner. We will never have short-hair Weim pups! 

We have silver(grey) Weims and blue Weims. Blue Weims are not an accepted color in any Kennel Club.....so we breed those too! ;)  They are beautiful!
 
Some breeders haveLongHairs pop up in their litters. And unfortunately some breeders didn't recognize that a pup was a longhair, so they docked the tail on their longhair puppy!  But we know when you breed two longhair Weims--you only get LongHair pups, so any pups we have will have long, feathery tails. 

 Males are approximately 25-27 inches in height at the withers (shoulder); while females are 23-25 inches. The breed is athletic and not heavy for its height - Weimaraner males average 70-85 pounds with females typically weighing between 55-65 pounds. Some perfectly healthy Weims can weigh as little as fifty pounds. Eye color is anything from light amber to deep blue to grey. 

Mission Statement on Long Haired Weimaraner

The Long Haired variant has been described as very similar in appearance and positive attitude to a Flat Coated Retriever.  They are incredibly intelligent, loyal dogs that bond deeply with their owners.  They make exceptional companions and maintain many of the same characteristics as the Flat Coated Retriever in form, function and temperament.  They are however… different from the status quo for the American breed standard.  They very much appear to look similar to a Flat Coated Retriever in profile, but their colors are Silver/Grey or Blue.  These are literally the diluted complimentary colors to the Liver and Black Flat Coated Retriever. 

Weimaraners are an “HPR” type of dog, that’s a Hunter, Pointer, Retriever and like our retrievers they love a good run and they love water.  The Long Hair is said to have a much calmer temperament than it’s shorthaired variant, and from our first hand account we can say with certainty that they are just as ready to turn it on outdoors as our other sporting dogs, yet quickly settle in for a docile demeanor when indoors. 

Our Goal is to breed the longhair to offer them as a choice outside of the short haired status quo in the United States.  And in the future we will assess whether introducing this pointer breed into the FCR lines via future outcrossing will be beneficial long term in providing our lines of dogs with more advantages over the status quo.  If we look at other outcrosses that have worked successfully in reshuffling the genetic deck then the outlook for any future outcrossing using the Long Haired Weimaraner is extremely promising. Bobtail Boxers and LUA Dalmations are examples of how outcrossing a Corgi to a Boxer and a German Pointer to a Dalmation has in fact helped those pure breeds by introducing genes from other breeds to either correct an existing health problem or provide an option to severing an appendage on a dog for cosmetic purposes. 

Weimaraners have fewer health problems than the FCR.  They have a longer life expectancy and many of the same characteristics found desirable in the FCR.  So hopefully they can offer some positive to the FCR to produce a variant that is healthier, longer living and just as lovable as what we know FCR to be, except with a definite health advantage over the current FCR breeding populations.   Keep an eye on this site.  Lots of promising good things can come of this.






  
 

    



    


    


               



    



    




  
   

              


  


     

       
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